Download The Leader Cult in Communist Dictatorships: Stalin and the by Balázs Apor, Jan C. Behrends, Polly Jones, E. A. Rees (eds.) PDF

By Balázs Apor, Jan C. Behrends, Polly Jones, E. A. Rees (eds.)

The first publication to investigate the specified chief cults that flourished within the period of 'High Stalinism' as a vital part of the procedure of dictatorial rule within the Soviet Union and jap Europe. Fifteen reports discover the best way those cults have been verified, their functionality and operation, their dissemination and reception, where of the cults in paintings and literature, the exportation of the Stalin cult and its implantment within the communist states of jap Europe, and the effect which de-Stalinisation had on those cults.

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The Leader Cult in Communist Dictatorships: Stalin and the Eastern Bloc

The 1st booklet to investigate the precise chief cults that flourished within the period of 'High Stalinism' as an essential component of the procedure of dictatorial rule within the Soviet Union and jap Europe. Fifteen reviews discover the way those cults have been tested, their functionality and operation, their dissemination and reception, where of the cults in artwork and literature, the exportation of the Stalin cult and its implantment within the communist states of japanese Europe, and the effect which de-Stalinisation had on those cults.

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40. N. S. Timasheff, The Great Retreat: The Growth and Decline of Communism in Russia (New York, 1946); E. A. Rees, ‘Stalin and Russian Nationalism’ in Geoffrey Hosking and Robert Service (eds) Russian Nationalism, Past and Present (London, 1997); Maureen Perrie, The Cult of Ivan the Terrible in Stalin’s Russia (Basingstoke, 2001); Nicholas V. Riasanovsky, The Image of Peter the Great in Russian History and Thought (New York and Oxford, 1985). 41. ) The Nature of Stalin’s Dictatorship, pp. 225–6.

78 Stalin’s approach to the leader cult was in many ways complex and contradictory. He obviously did not discourage many cult initiatives, nor could the cult have assumed such proportions without his sanction. Yet at the same time he continued to limit some of its excesses and to promote a discourse critical of the ‘cult of personality’. Of course this was in itself an essential part of the making of the cult. Without this element of ‘modesty’, and its Leninist precedent, it would have lost much of its effectiveness as a means of boosting his personal authority.

Although Stalin derived evident political advantages from his cult, it was potentially a double-edged sword, capable of obstructing the serious goals of party and state. He realised, for example, that it could be exploited quite cynically by sycophantic careerists within the party. Naturally suspicious, he probably also assumed that behind every flatterer there lurked a potential traitor, feelings which would have been exacerbated by the experience of 1936–38. He was doubtless also aware that local leaders were modelling their mini-cults on his own.

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